A Latina Reddit User Asked How People Felt About Non-Spanish Speakers And The Answers Were Eye-Opening (2023)

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In 2017, aPew Research Center studyrevealed that while there has neen an increase in thenumberof Latino Spanish speakers at home, the overall number of Latinos who speak Spanish has declined significantly in the past decade. Ultimately, the finding revealed that while the Latino population continues to grow significantly a smaller percentage of Latinos actually speak Spanish.

For many of us, particularly those of us Latinos who don’t speak Spanish, these findings cause us to carry quite a bit of guilt. After all growing up, many of us were told that understanding the language of our abuelos and padres was vital.

For Latinos that have heard the words “¿No habla español?” and felt terrible, the blow Reddit conversation is for you.

“First of all: You’re not any less Latina for not knowing Spanish. There are plenty of Asian-Americans who don’t know their parents language, European-Americans and so on. It’s your culture and your identity and no one can tell you what you are and what you aren’t based on not knowing a certain language.

Secondly, as others have said, you’re in an excellent spot if you want to learn Spanish since you have so many native speakers at your disposal. I’d say use the resources from this sub to self teach yourself, and when you get to a certain level, tell your friends and family what you want to achieve and see how they respond. I’m sure most of them would love to practice with you and help you learn, and worst case scenario if they don’t want to, you can keep self teaching and just respond to them in Spanish at times anyway. I’ve lived abroad for a bit and will-power is a main component of language learning: when people try to speak English to me I don’t fall to the pressure and reply the best I can in Spanish. Not exactly a direct equivalent, but my advice. Buena suerte con su aprendizaje.” – Maxmutinium

“I have a buddy who is half Mexican. He even got a scholarship for it. He can’t even speak to his own grandmother because he doesn’t speak Spanish and she doesn’t speak English.” –MyParentsAre_Cousins

“Does anyone else who is Latinx and does not know Spanish feel this way?

Yeah. Oh yeah. Bilingual parents but it was always English in the home and even with high school and college classes I never quote got it. I’ve been told to my face that I’m not a real Puerto Rican because of it. I am very much one, but I feel very distanced from my own people because of it, from the language barrier, to the exclusion, to the culture difference with not being around Spanish speakers, to being bitter about the whole thing.

Are you trying to learn? If so, what’s working best for you to learn it?

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Yes, but I don’t tell people because they’ll start saying stuff I don’t understand or make a fuss over it. I prefer learning on my own terms. Duolingo has been my choice and it’s helped a lot. I feel like I’m starting to be able to think in Spanish which from what I know is a big step towards fluency.” –jclocks

“I’m in the same boat in a lot of ways. My parents didn’t speak much Spanish to me as a child and I only learned a sprinkling of words. In high school I hated spanish class because it made me feel inadequate. At family events I felt like an outsider when people switched to Spanish. I also was really frustrated when people asked me why I didn’t speak it since the assumption was that I had somehow chosen not to learn.

Two years ago I decided to commit to learning it. I went to Ecuador and spent 6 weeks taking one-on-one classes and living with a host family. Afterwards I could have broken conversations, but more importantly I was able to get past my fear of speaking in front of other Latinos. I don’t have the opportunity to do another immersion trip again in the near future, so this year I decided to really invest serious time into learning on my own. I do 5 hours of conversation a week with iTalki; I listen to Glossika on my commute to and from work; I do Anki flashcards every morning and I read Spanish articles using LingQ. I shoot for 2 hours minimum of active practice a day and I supplement that with listening to music in Spanish and Spanish podcasts. Even when I watch stuff in English on Netflix I put on Spanish subtitles to gain a little more exposure.

It’s working. I don’t consider myself fluent yet, but that’s only because my goals have become more ambitious (I want to have native-like proficiency). I’ve put about 500-600 hours worth of study in since I started and I can have conversations and listen to Ted Talks in Spanish. It feels great and I’ve learned a lot about my culture and other Latin cultures as a result.

If you’re willing to put the time in (many experts think it takes more than a 1,000 hours to hit a very high level of proficiency) you can do it too. But you really have to create clear goals and habits built around your learning. Last year I was stagnant and it’s because I didn’t have goals and habits to really develop my fluency. And while an immersion trip with classes can really jumpstart the learning process you don’t need it to become fluent so long as you plug in hour after hour into active exposure and study. Also, if you had exposure to spanish as a baby, you probably have an advantage. There’s studies linking exposure to a language in the early months to a lifelong capacity to make out the sounds of that language better than people who weren’t exposed to it as children. That really helps when it comes to listening and to developing an accent. A lot of my tutors tell me I don’t have the gringo accent, which is also really encouraging.” –eatmoreicecream

“I feel like shit that I grew up with Puerto Rican family, and Spanish speaking ALL around me and still don’t speak it at 28. I also had bilingual childhood friends. The environment was PERFECT for me to grow up fluent in two languages.

Yet here I am close to 30 and I can’t speak shit. I keep telling myself I want to learn but now I feel bummed out that I’m aging past being able to sound “native” anymore.

Double this is my father was disappointed I didn’t know not too long before he died and I feel like all the people who assume I’m fluent in Spanish when they approach is him nudging me on and still nagging for me to learn lol. There’s a definite guilt and “I’m ignoring an entire part of my awesome upbringing” thing going on.

Edit: Missed too many words in the first one that made it sound like I felt like shit about growing up in the environment instead of about not learning Spanish lol. Edit edit: One of my worst regrets is from elementary school, where a teacher asked us what a really simple word in Spanish meant. I knew it of course, but I stayed quiet for whatever dumb reason. Pretty sure that was to test the potential to learn before teaching us the language another missed opportunity to plant the seeds in my young mind. HINDSIGHT IS 20/20 DAMNIT.” –IniMiney

“Forget about sounding native, that’s only something that’s in your mind. You’re never too old to learn a language! I picked up Russian two years ago almost and I’m 35!”- Effervescent_513

“Don’t feel bad, it’s not true that you’ll need sound native. You have to dedicate yourself to training your ear to hearing exactly the sounds, and teaching your speech organ to produce some the new sounds. I really recommend Mimic Method for this. I’ve not even finished the Spanish course and I was confusing Spanish Speakers on holiday because whilst I looked and was foreign what little I knew was pronounced well (sorry, I am widening my doorframes.” –Brutussaid

“I’ve been called white washed and Gabacha (sp?) Because I don’t speak Spanish but have been surrounded by it my whole life. I even married and had a kid with a Latino, and his whole family speaks Spanish too! The only ones in my family that don’t know are me, my brother and sister. It’s so hard. I know a little, but not enough to hold a casual conversation. Everyone is too fast. Plus we’re friends with a lot of Salvadorians and that’s even harder to understand! There’s no way my kid is going to grow up without knowing 2 languages at least. I feel so alienated, some of my in laws’ friends think I’m either quiet or mean because I can’t even understand half of what they’re saying. I have to have someone actively translate for me just to be included in everything.” –MoistCreamPuffs

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“I 100% relate to you. I hope to one day marry a Latino that knows Spanish so that way my kid will grow up with learning the language and maybe my future husband can help me too. I too feel alienated when I’m constantly surrounded by Spanish speakers and I barely understand what they’re saying, but with that being said I think both you and I have a great advantage to learn the language because we know so many Spanish speakers. With the help of redditor’s advice, I’m more than confident that it isn’t too late for us to learn! We got this girl!” –lrvxoxo

“Being Latina and not knowing spanish is one of the worst things ever… like I literally feel like a disgrace to my heritage.

Spanish is the language of the conquistadors. It is not the languages of the natives in most of the lands that the language dominates.

Try not to be too hard on yourself.

It will take time, but you can learn. It’s never too late to start! There are many, many free and low cost resources. ¡Buena suerte!” –confusedchild02

Spanish is the language of the conquistadors. It is not the languages of the natives in most of the lands that the language dominates.

The “conquistadors” are our ancestors too! It depends on the location too but Latin America unlike other parts of the world is a mixture from Spanish and the indigenous population in a bigger or smaller proportion. In other words it’s not like Spanish is a foreign language like French is in Africa and English is in India, it’s part of our culture as well and if you don’t speak it you do miss out a huge part of the culture.” –ffuentes

“Being Latina means she could be either 100% or 0% descended from indigenous people.

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Though it’s irrelevant because the vast majority of modern Latin Americans have been speaking Spanish (or Portuguese) for generations, and very few identify with anything other than their nationality.” –Enmerkahr

“My ex was Mexican but didn’t speak Spanish. I studied it in school as a second language. He was no where near as good as me, but he had a really good foundation that I didn’t.

Something I struggle with as a non native speaker is that there are just so many words. If you remain consistent and study vocabulary, you’ll know a lot. But there are just so many things you don’t know because you have no reason to know.

Native speakers don’t really have that disadvantage. They’ve heard just about everything at some point even if they can’t recall it off of the top of their heads.

I’m willing to bet that if you started studying in a classroom setting, you’d be fluent in no time.” –TheMeanGirl

“It’s okay. There are a lot of us.” –LolliPoppies

“You situation is favorable over mine as a white guy, I know very few native Spanish speakers, much less that are willing to help me practice on a regular basis. Yo que tu, I would ask my parents to converse with me in Spanish as much as possible and you’ll learn super fast that way.” –TesticlesMcTitties

“I’ve told my parents to help me learn that way in the past & my parents will speak to me in Spanish for like an hour and then stop till the next time I ask, so it’s annoying constantly reminding them to talk to me in Spanish. But I’ll definitely push for it more because I’m sure if they were consistent, I would probably learn super fast as you said.” –lrvxoxo

“Even if you are not fluent, based on your surroundings can you pick up phrases? You might have heard many phrases and understand it but not explain it like a teacher. If this is the case, think of it like filling in the gaps. Never too late to learn.” –MisterE2k14

“I think phrases are the easiest to learn and I think that’s what I know most of, but then again like I said what I do know is very minimal. Thank you for the tip about filling in the gaps, I appreciate it!”- lrvxoxo

“I speak Spanish but not the languages of my grandparents and great-grandparents. I also always thought I was terrible as languages as a kid. Don’t sweat it! There are loads of resources you can download, perhaps more than for many other language. Also you have the advantage that people outside of your family you meet will presume you speak it, so just act like you do – I did. You definitely shouldn’t take this to heart or feel bad about it, but it can definitely act as a motivation. Learn a few stock phrases and just nod, search out group conversations where you don’t need to talk much, watch films and listen to music or podcasts about topics that interest you. Don’t stress about not catching everything; even if you’re a native speaker, you won’t get everything. If there are folks in your city (or extended family, friends) that are native Spanish speakers and struggling, try to spend time teaching them English. Also try to find native English learners of Spanish – you’ll be less nervous speaking to them. Things like Memrise, Lingvist, Clozemaster, Babadum are all great because they’re more active, since sometimes it’s difficult to pick stuff up if you’re only learning stuff passively.” –metalaffect

“In the same exact spot as you. Everyone in my entire extended family knows Spanish except for me and my brothers. It’s easily the thing I hate most about myself. And I feel like I barely have a close connection to most of my family because they have to communicate with me in their non native language and it’s hard to become close that way.

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Once I finish my schooling which will actually be in a couple weeks, I plan to go hardcore with my Spanish learning. I have native speakers right at home in my parents so I hope that the process can go relatively smoothly and quickly.” –MrProfessor

“I’m Latino. My aunts, uncles all speak Spanish. My grandparents spoke Spanish. My mom spoke Spanish. But not me. I only knew a little bit from growing up around it but over the past year and a half I finally buckled down and started learning for real. I’m 46. I’m very proud of being Latino. My goal of learning Spanish has more to do with just being more open to non-US culture as well as just wanting to be able to converse in a language my family knows so well.

Oh, and of course I was called a ‘coconut’ by other Latino kids growing up – brown on the outside, white on the inside. But, hey, being Latino makes you thick skinned anyway, so I’m not worried about that. I’m not going to stop with Spanish.

I now fall into the category of ‘I can read it really well, but only pick up about 50% of what is spoken’. I don’t think I’m any less Latino because I never learned Spanish before, I do wish I’d learned before my grandmother passed. She did not speak much English and was fiercely proud of being Latina.

What worked for me was basically immersion, Duolingo, YouTube and Pimsluer, and not thinking I could learn in a month. You didn’t learn English in a month, and additionally, you learned by hearing first, which is kind of the opposite of how people try to learn a second language. You will almost immediately remember words or phrases that Spanish speaking people tell you/correct you on, but it’s a lot harder to just learn words and phrases on your own.

For me, I also discovered that working daily, often really devoting time to it, is best reinforced bynotworking as hard for a bit. It seems like my brain catches up – suddenly I’ll go back and watch a show on Univision or read a Spanish article and it’s like I can magically read far more than I could before.

Next step for me is a tutor. I’m at the point where I can speak broken Spanish, probably better than my grandmother spoke English. But I, like most people, want fluency.” –silverbax

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FAQs

Can you be Hispanic and not speak Spanish Reddit? ›

Not necessarily. Hispanic means you have ties to a Spanish-speaking country.

Is Latinx still a thing? ›

According to the Pew Research Center, a thimble-sized portion of people with Latin American ancestry use the term Latinx. In August 2020, the center reported that 3 percent of respondents viewed it favorably; a year later, a Gallup poll increased that to 4 percent.

What is my race if I am Hispanic? ›

People who identify themselves as Spanish, Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Hispanic or Latino refers to people whose ancestors or descendants originated in Central and South America and in the Caribbean, who follow the customs and cultures of these areas and who may speak Spanish.

Are Mexicans Latino or Hispanic? ›

Mexican refers to people who inhabit for are from Mexico, a part of Latin America. Spanish is the main language in Mexico, but not all Mexicans speak the language. This means that people from Mexico are Latino, and they may or may not be Hispanic.

What do Mexicans call other Mexicans that don't speak Spanish? ›

Pocho (feminine: pocha) is slang in Spanish used in Mexico to refer to Mexican Americans and Mexican emigrants. It is often used pejoratively to describe a Mexican expatriate or a person of Mexican ancestry who lacks fluency or the ability to speak in Spanish and knowledge of Mexican culture.

Can all Latinos understand each other? ›

Latin American Spanish

While there are many dialects spoken in the Americas, speakers of almost all can understand each other without major difficulties.

What is the difference between Latina and Latinx? ›

LATINX A gender-neutral term to refer to a Latino/Latina person. The “x” replaces the male and female endings “o” and “a” that are part of Spanish grammar conventions. This term comes from American-born Latinos/Latinas who want to be more inclusive and gender neutral, which is more akin to the English language.

What's the difference between Latinx and Latina? ›

Latinx is coined from Latino and Latina in an effort to be more inclusive to gender non-conforming individuals. Latino and Latina are the masculine and feminine forms of the word, while Latinos is traditionally used as the plural to refer to groups of men and women together.

What is my race if I am white? ›

White – A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

What is my race if I am Dominican? ›

Genetics and ethnicities

According to a 2015 genealogical DNA study of the Dominican population, their genetic makeup was estimated to be predominantly European and Sub-Saharan African, with a lesser degree of Native American ancestry.

What is my ethnicity if I am Mexican but born in America? ›

The Definition of 'Hispanic' And 'Latino' Varies By Region

This is similar to New Mexico. Hispanic became the category that means a U.S.-born Mexican-American person.

Are Mexicans and Latina the same? ›

"To be considered Latina/Latino/Latinx, you or your ancestors must have come from a Latin American country: Mexico, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Cuba, French-speaking Caribbean nations, Central or South America (though English-speaking regions)." Someone with roots in those countries—or as in Puerto Rico's case, ...

Is there a difference between Hispanic and Latino? ›

Hispanic and Latino are often used interchangeably though they actually mean two different things. Hispanic refers to people who speak Spanish or are descended from Spanish-speaking populations, while Latino refers to people who are from or descended from people from Latin America.

Is there a difference between Hispanic and Mexican? ›

Mexican refers to an inhabitant or a native of Mexico which is a Latin American country. Hispanic refers to a person who speaks Spanish, one of Latin American descent and resides in the USA. In Mexico, Spanish is the main language but that doesn't mean that all Mexicans can and do speak the language.

What do you call a Hispanic that doesn't know Spanish? ›

Many American-born Latinos like Esparza have been called a “pocho” or “pocha,” a pejorative used to describe Mexican Americans who don't speak Spanish fluently, at some point in their lives.

What is the Mexican word for no? ›

Even if you are an absolute beginner, you already know the two most important words in Spanish. Let me break it down for you: Sí (Yes). No (No).

Can other Spanish speakers understand each other? ›

Generally speaking, yes: Once you learn Spanish, you can understand any Spanish dialect. We, native Spanish speakers, understand each other just fine.

Do Latinos hug a lot? ›

Physical contact communicates affection. Hugs and kisses are deeply rooted in Latino culture, which places high value on family and interpersonal relationships, said Cristalis Capielo Rosario, a professor of counseling psychology at Arizona State University who is of Puerto Rican descent.

Can Spanish and Mexican people understand each other? ›

The Spanish vs Mexican debate is an interesting way of understanding how languages evolve and how they stay the same. Because it's amazing that after 500 years of being apart, Mexicans and Spaniards can still understand each other without any trouble.

What does being Latina mean to you? ›

Being Latino means so much to me. It means my roots, unity, family, my past, present, and future, it means my daughter, it means my culture, and it is the one thing you cannot take away from me for I own it, accept it, and embrace it every step I take and every move I make.

Why is Latino not Latinx? ›

Latinx is a neologism in American English which is used to refer to people of Latin American cultural or ethnic identity in the United States. The gender-neutral ⟨-x⟩ suffix replaces the ⟨-o/-a⟩ ending of Latino and Latina that are typical of grammatical gender in Spanish. Its plural is Latinxs.

Is it OK to say Hispanic? ›

When talking about people of Latin American descent in the U.S. you can generally use Latino (or Latina for a woman). Hispanic is also correct if you are talking to someone who speaks Spanish. But if you value your life, never ever say a Brazilian is a Hispanic.

What is the difference between Latina and Chicana? ›

Chicano is a person, having Mexican parents or grandparents but born in the United States. Latino is a person born in or with ancestors from Latin America. Chicano is a chosen identity of some Mexican Americans in the United States. The term Latino is officially adopted by the Government of the United States.

How many Latinos identify as Latinx? ›

The term is not well known among the population it is meant to describe. Only 23% of U.S. adults who self-identify as Hispanic or Latino have heard of the term Latinx, and just 3% say they use it to describe themselves, according to a 2019 survey.

Why do they ask if you are Hispanic? ›

We ask a question about whether a person is of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin to create statistics about this ethnic group. Local, state, tribal, and federal programs use these data, and they are critical factors in the basic research behind numerous policies, particularly for civil rights.

Is Gomez a Mexican last name? ›

Gómez (frequently anglicized as Gomez) is a common Spanish patronymic surname meaning "son of Gome". The Portuguese and Old Galician version is Gomes, while the Catalan form is Gomis.

Whats the most common last name? ›

what's the most common last name in the U.S? If you guessed Smith you are correct. According to an analysis by 24/7 Wall Street, the surname Smith occurs slightly more than 828 times per 100,000 people in the U.S., or about 2.442 million times. The name's usage has grown almost 3 percent since 2000.

What are the 7 races of the world? ›

Categorizing Race and Ethnicity
  • White.
  • Black or African American.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native.
  • Asian.
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.
4 Aug 2021

What is white ethnicity called? ›

White. The term usually used to describe people with European ancestral origins who identify, or are identified, as White (sometimes called European, or in terms of racial classifications, the group known as Caucasian or Caucasoid).

What is my ethnicity if I am white Australian? ›

White Australian may refer to: European Australians, Australians with European ancestry. Anglo-Celtic Australians, an Australian with ancestry from the British Isles.

Are there white Dominicans? ›

White Dominicans (Spanish: "Dominicanos blancos") are Dominican people of predominant European descent. They are 17.8% of the Dominican Republic's population, according to a census bureau survey from 2022.

What is the DNA of a Dominican? ›

In modern days and according to genealogical DNA testing, the genetic makeup of the Dominican population is estimated to be 52% European, 40% Sub‐Saharan African, and 8% Native American‐Taino (Montinaro et al.

What makes a Dominican black? ›

Afro-Dominicans (also referred to as African-Dominicans or Black Dominicans) are Dominicans of predominant Black African ancestry. They are a minority in the country representing 7.8% of the Dominican Republic's population according to a census bureau survey in 2022.

Can I be Mexican If I wasn't born in Mexico? ›

Nationality by birth

The Mexican Constitution states that Mexican nationals by birth are: people born on Mexican territory regardless of their parent's nationality. people born abroad to at least one parent who is a national of Mexico. people born on Mexican vessels or aircraft that are either for war or merchant.

Can I become a Mexican citizen if my parents are Mexican? ›

If one or both of your parents have Mexican nationality you may be able to become a Mexican citizen by birth. This process is used when you're born outside of Mexico, and especially useful if you're born in a country where you're automatically granted citizenship based on your place of birth².

Where do most Mexican live in USA? ›

Most Mexican Americans reside in the Southwest (over 60% in the states of California and Texas).

What qualifies as Hispanic? ›

OMB defines "Hispanic or Latino" as a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin regardless of race.

Is being Hispanic the same as being Spanish? ›

In a literal sense, Hispanic refers to people who speak Spanish or who are descended from Spanish speaking lineage. This English word evolved from the Latin word Hispanicus, which is reported to have been used to refer to people living in Hispania — the Iberian Peninsula in today's Spain — during the Roman Empire.

Do you self identify as Hispanic or Latino? ›

Americans of Hispanic ancestry are those who either self-identify as Hispanic or Latino or say they have Hispanic ancestors but do not self-identify as Hispanic. U.S. born refers to persons born in the United States and those born in other countries to parents at least one of whom was a U.S. citizen.

Can a job tell you not to speak Spanish? ›

Can Your Employer Prohibit You From Speaking Spanish at Your Job? Under California's Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) and federal law, it is illegal for an employer to discriminate against an employee based on his native language or manner of speech, such as accent, size of his vocabulary, and syntax.

What is the difference between Mexican and Latino? ›

1. “Latino” is a word which is used to refer to the people living in the USA who are Spanish speaking or of Spanish descent while “Mexican” is a word which is used to refer to the people, culture, and language of Mexico. 2.

What is the difference between Latino Latina and Latinx? ›

Latinx is coined from Latino and Latina in an effort to be more inclusive to gender non-conforming individuals. Latino and Latina are the masculine and feminine forms of the word, while Latinos is traditionally used as the plural to refer to groups of men and women together.

Which of the following statements best describes the Latino population in the United States quizlet? ›

Fewer than half of Latinos believe the courts will deal with them fairly. Which of the following statements best describes the Latino population in the United States? They have extraordinary class diversity.

What's the difference between Hispanic Latino and Latinx? ›

Hispanic usually refers to people with a background in a Spanish-speaking country, while Latino is typically used to identify people from Latin America. Latinx - or Latine - is another term used for people of Latin American descent.

Is it rude to speak another language in front of others who can t? ›

Generally speaking, yes, it is rude. If there is a diverse group of people who speak a range of different languages, it is best to communicate with each other in a language that everybody has in common. That's the best way to insure everybody feels included.

Can you get fired for not knowing Spanish? ›

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has stated that rules requiring employees to speak only English in the workplace may be illegal unless the employer can show that they are justified by business necessity.

Can your boss tell you not to speak Spanish in Texas? ›

Accent or Manner of Speaking

Requiring employees or applicants to be fluent in English may violate the law if the requirement is adopted to exclude individuals of a particular national origin and is not related to job performance.

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