Mechanical Engineering BS | RIT (2022)

Mechanical Engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181

General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Project-Based CalculusI

This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisite: A- or better in MATH-111 or A- or better in ((NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) and NMTH-220) or a math placement exam score greater than or equal to 70 or department permission to enroll in this class.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MATH-182

General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Project-Based CalculusII

This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in (MATH-181 or MATH-173 or 1016-282) or (MATH-171 and MATH-180) or equivalent course(s).) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MECE-102

Engineering Mechanics Laboratory

This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in an accompanying laboratory session. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software. (Prerequisite: This class is restricted to MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-103

Statics

This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-104

Engineering Design Tools

This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, how to use a CAD package to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes. (This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS Major students.) Lab 1 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-117

Introduction to Programming for Engineers

This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS.Co-requisite: MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
YOPS-010

RIT 365: RIT Connections

RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0

General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)

3

General Education – Artistic Perspective

3

General Education – Ethical Perspective

3

General Education – Elective

3
Second Year
EGEN-099

Engineering Co-op Preparation

This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0
MATH-219

General Education – Elective: Multivariable Calculus

This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MATH-231

General Education – Elective: Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MECE-110

Thermodynamics I

A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances. These techniques are then used to evaluate thermodynamic cycles for a variety of applications in power generation and refrigeration. Students are then introduced to techniques to improve thermal efficiency of these cycles such as reheat, regeneration, and co-generation. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-203

Strength of MaterialsI

A basic course in the fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable media, including stress, strain, deflections and the relationships among them. The basic loadings of tension, compression, shear, torsion and bending are also included. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-204

Strength of Materials I Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-203. Students investigate a metallic material’s response to axial, torsional, and bending loads. Students are introduced to reduction and analysis of data, basic experimental techniques, and effective report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MECE-203) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-205

Dynamics

A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-210

Fluid Mechanics I

This course investigates the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows include Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines and streak-lines. Classification of flows include fluid statics, hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws are investigated including systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation are utilized when analyzing fluid systems. Other concepts studied include incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis. (Prerequisites: MECE-110 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-211

Engineering Measurements Lab (WI-PR)

This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include:• Physical dimension variability assessment• Centrifugal pump performance evaluation• Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements• LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application• Transient measurements including computer data acquisition• Digital signal input and outputEach topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

2

General Education – Global Perspective

3

General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective

3

General Education – Social Perspective

3

General Education – Immersion

3
Third Year
EEEE-281

Circuits I

Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MATH-326

General Education – Elective: Boundary Value Problems

This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems. (Prerequisites: (MATH-231 or MATH-233) and (MATH-219 or MATH-221) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-305

Materials Science with Applications

This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers (Prerequisite: MECE-203 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS, MECEDU-BS, MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-306

Materials Science with Applications Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS or ENGRX-UND students.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-320

System Dynamics

This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation. (Prerequisites: MECE-205 and MATH-231 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEEE-281This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Co-op (fall and summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0
PHYS-212

General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: University PhysicsII

This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).

4
Fourth Year
MATH-241

General Education – Elective: Linear Algebra

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MATH-190 or MATH-200 or MATH-219 or MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-301

Engineering Applications Laboratory

As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results. (Prerequisites: (MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206) and MECE-104 and MECE-211 or equivalent courses and is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

2
MECE-310

Heat Transfer I

A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods. (Prerequisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-348

Contemporary Issues (WI-PR)

This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally. (Prerequisite or Co-requisites: MECE-499 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Co-op (fall and summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0

General Education – ME Approved Science Elective

3

ME Extended Core Elective

3
Fifth Year
MECE-497

Multidisciplinary Senior DesignI

This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-301 and MECE-499 or equivalent courses.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-498

Multidisciplinary Senior DesignII

This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-497 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
STAT-205

General Education – Elective: Applied Statistics

This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252.. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3

ME Applied Elective

3

ME Extended Core or Applied Elective

(Video) Here's Why Mechanical Engineering Is A Great Degree

3

General Education – Immersion2,3

6

Open Electives

9
Total Semester Credit Hours

129

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Professional Options

Students who elect to pursue a Professional Option may use a combination of Extended and Applied Core Electives to complete one of the options listed below:

Aerospace
Required Courses
MECE-3XX

Extended Core- Aerospace option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Aerospace option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Aerospace option

Automotive
Required Courses
MECE-3XX

Extended Core- Automotive option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Automotive option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Automotive option

Bioengineering
Required Courses
MECE-3XX

Extended Core- Bioengineering Option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Bioengineering Option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Bioengineering Option

Energy and Environment
Required Courses
MECE-3XX

Extended Core- Energy and Environment option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Energy and Environment option

MECE-4XX

Applied Core- Energy and Environment option

Accelerated Dual-Degree Programs

Today’s careers require advanced degrees grounded in real-world experience. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Pathways enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in as little as five years of study. You’ll earn two degrees while gaining the valuable, hands-on experience that comes from co-ops, internships, research, study abroad, and more. Learn how a Combined Accelerated Pathway can prepare you for your future, faster.

Mechanical Engineering, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181

General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Project-Based CalculusI

This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisite: A- or better in MATH-111 or A- or better in ((NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) and NMTH-220) or a math placement exam score greater than or equal to 70 or department permission to enroll in this class.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MATH-182

General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Project-Based CalculusII

This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in (MATH-181 or MATH-173 or 1016-282) or (MATH-171 and MATH-180) or equivalent course(s).) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MECE-102

Engineering Mechanics Laboratory

This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in an accompanying laboratory session. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software. (Prerequisite: This class is restricted to MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-103

Statics

This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-104

Engineering Design Tools

This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, how to use a CAD package to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes. (This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS Major students.) Lab 1 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-117

Introduction to Programming for Engineers

This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS.Co-requisite: MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
YOPS-010

RIT 365: RIT Connections

RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0

General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)

3

General Education – Artistic Perspective

3

General Education – Ethical Perspective

3

General Education – Elective

3
Second Year
EGEN-099

Engineering Co-op Preparation

This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0
MATH-219

General Education – Elective: Multivariable Calculus

This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MATH-231

General Education – Elective: Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MECE-110

Thermodynamics I

A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances. These techniques are then used to evaluate thermodynamic cycles for a variety of applications in power generation and refrigeration. Students are then introduced to techniques to improve thermal efficiency of these cycles such as reheat, regeneration, and co-generation. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-203

Strength of Materials I

A basic course in the fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable media, including stress, strain, deflections and the relationships among them. The basic loadings of tension, compression, shear, torsion and bending are also included. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-204

Strength of Materials I Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-203. Students investigate a metallic material’s response to axial, torsional, and bending loads. Students are introduced to reduction and analysis of data, basic experimental techniques, and effective report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MECE-203) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-205

Dynamics

A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-210

Fluid Mechanics I

This course investigates the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows include Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines and streak-lines. Classification of flows include fluid statics, hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws are investigated including systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation are utilized when analyzing fluid systems. Other concepts studied include incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis. (Prerequisites: MECE-110 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-211

Engineering Measurements Lab (WI-PR)

This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include:• Physical dimension variability assessment• Centrifugal pump performance evaluation• Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements• LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application• Transient measurements including computer data acquisition• Digital signal input and outputEach topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

2

General Education – Global Perspective

3

General Education – Social Perspective

3

General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective

3

General Education – Immersion1

3
Third Year
EEEE-281

Circuits I

Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MATH-326

General Education – Elective: Boundary Value Problems

This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems. (Prerequisites: (MATH-231 or MATH-233) and (MATH-219 or MATH-221) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-305

Materials Science with Applications

This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers (Prerequisite: MECE-203 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS, MECEDU-BS, MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-306

Materials Science with Applications Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS or ENGRX-UND students.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-320

System Dynamics

This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation. (Prerequisites: MECE-205 and MATH-231 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEEE-281This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Cooperative Education (fall and summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0
PHYS-212

General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: University PhysicsII

This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).

(Video) B.S. Mechanical Engineering

4
Fourth Year
MATH-241

General Education – Elective: Linear Algebra

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MATH-190 or MATH-200 or MATH-219 or MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-301

Engineering Applications Laboratory

As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results. (Prerequisites: (MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206) and MECE-104 and MECE-211 or equivalent courses and is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

2
MECE-310

Heat Transfer I

A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods. (Prerequisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-348

Contemporary Issues (WI-PR)

This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally. (Prerequisite or Co-requisites: MECE-499 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Cooperative Education (summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0
MECE-707

Engineering Analysis

This course trains students to utilize mathematical techniques from an engineering perspective, and provides essential background for success in graduate level studies. An intensive review of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms is provided. Laplace transform methods are extended to boundary-value problems and applications to control theory are discussed. Problem solving efficiency is stressed, and to this end, the utility of various available techniques are contrasted. The frequency response of ordinary differential equations is discussed extensively. Applications of linear algebra are examined, including the use of eigenvalue analysis in the solution of linear systems and in multivariate optimization. An introduction to Fourier analysis is also provided. (Prerequisites: (MATH-241 and MATH-326) or graduate student standing in the MECE-MS or MECE-ME programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-795

Graduate Seminar (fall and spring)

This seminar course presents topics of contemporary interest to graduate students enrolled in the program. Presentations include off campus speakers, and assistance with progressing on your research. Selected students and faculty may make presentations on current research under way in the department. All graduate students enrolled full time (whether dual degree or single degree) are required to attend a designated number of seminars. (This course is restricted to MECEMS-U or MECE-MS or MECE-ME or MECEME-U Major students.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).

0
STAT-205

General Education – Elective: Applied Statistics

This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252.. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3

General Education – ME Approved Science Elective

3

ME Extended Core Elective

3

Graduate Focus Area Course

3

Open Elective

3

Graduate Electives

6
Fifth Year
MECE-497

Multidisciplinary Sr. DesignI

This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-301 and MECE-499 or equivalent courses.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-498

Multidisciplinary Sr. DesignII

This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-497 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-709

Advanced Engineering Mathematics

Advanced Engineering Mathematics provides the foundations for complex functions, vector calculus and advanced linear algebra and its applications in analyzing and solving a variety of mechanical engineering problems especially in the areas of mechanics, continuum mechanics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and vibrations. Topics include: vector algebra, vector calculus, functions of complex variables, ordinary differential equations and local stability, advanced matrix algebra, and partial differential equations. Mechanical engineering applications will be discussed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MECE-707 or equivalent course or graduate student standing in MECE-MS or MECE-ME.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-790

Thesis

Thesis In conference with an adviser, a topic is chosen. Periodic progress reports and a final written document with an oral examination are required. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).

6

General Education – Immersion2,3

6

Graduate Focus Area Courses

6

Graduate Electives

6
Total Semester Credit Hours

150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Mechanical Engineering, BS/ME degree, typical course sequence

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181

General Education – Mathematical Perspective A: Project-Based CalculusI

This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisite: A- or better in MATH-111 or A- or better in ((NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) and NMTH-220) or a math placement exam score greater than or equal to 70 or department permission to enroll in this class.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MATH-182

General Education – Mathematical Perspective B: Project-Based CalculusII

This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in (MATH-181 or MATH-173 or 1016-282) or (MATH-171 and MATH-180) or equivalent course(s).) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MECE-102

Engineering Mechanics Laboratory

This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in an accompanying laboratory session. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software. (Prerequisite: This class is restricted to MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-103

Statics

This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-104

Engineering Design Tools

This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, how to use a CAD package to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes. (This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS Major students.) Lab 1 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-117

Introduction to Programming for Engineers

This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS.Co-requisite: MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
YOPS-010

RIT 365: RIT Connections

RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0

General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)

3

General Education – Elective

3

General Education – Artistic Perspective

3

General Education – Ethical Perspective

3
Second Year
EGEN-099

Engineering Co-op Preparation

This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0
MATH-219

General Education – Elective: Multivariable Calculus

This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MATH-231

General Education – Elective: Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MECE-110

Thermodynamics I

A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances. These techniques are then used to evaluate thermodynamic cycles for a variety of applications in power generation and refrigeration. Students are then introduced to techniques to improve thermal efficiency of these cycles such as reheat, regeneration, and co-generation. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-203

Strength of Materials I

A basic course in the fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable media, including stress, strain, deflections and the relationships among them. The basic loadings of tension, compression, shear, torsion and bending are also included. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-204

Strength of Materials I Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-203. Students investigate a metallic material’s response to axial, torsional, and bending loads. Students are introduced to reduction and analysis of data, basic experimental techniques, and effective report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MECE-203) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-205

Dynamics

A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-210

Fluid Mechanics I

This course investigates the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows include Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines and streak-lines. Classification of flows include fluid statics, hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws are investigated including systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation are utilized when analyzing fluid systems. Other concepts studied include incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis. (Prerequisites: MECE-110 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-211

Engineering Measurements Lab (WI-PR)

This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include:• Physical dimension variability assessment• Centrifugal pump performance evaluation• Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements• LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application• Transient measurements including computer data acquisition• Digital signal input and outputEach topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

2

General Education – Global Perspective

3

General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective

(Video) Ano ba talaga trabaho ng Mechanical Engineer? My personal view kung ano trabaho ng ME.

3

General Education – Social Perspective

3

General Education – Immersion1

3
Third Year
EEEE-281

Circuits I

Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MATH-326

General Education – Elective: Boundary Value Problems

This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems. (Prerequisites: (MATH-231 or MATH-233) and (MATH-219 or MATH-221) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-305

Materials Science with Applications

This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers (Prerequisite: MECE-203 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS, MECEDU-BS, MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-306

Materials Science with Applications Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS or ENGRX-UND students.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-320

System Dynamics

This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation. (Prerequisites: MECE-205 and MATH-231 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEEE-281This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Cooperative Education (fall and summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0
PHYS-212

General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: University PhysicsII

This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).

4
Fourth Year
MATH-241

General Education – Elective: Linear Algebra

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MATH-190 or MATH-200 or MATH-219 or MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-301

Engineering Applications Laboratory

As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results. (Prerequisites: (MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206) and MECE-104 and MECE-211 or equivalent courses and is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

2
MECE-310

Heat Transfer I

A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods. (Prerequisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-348

Contemporary Issues (WI-PR)

This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally. (Prerequisite or Co-requisites: MECE-499 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Cooperative Education (summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0
MECE-707

Engineering Analysis

This course trains students to utilize mathematical techniques from an engineering perspective, and provides essential background for success in graduate level studies. An intensive review of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms is provided. Laplace transform methods are extended to boundary-value problems and applications to control theory are discussed. Problem solving efficiency is stressed, and to this end, the utility of various available techniques are contrasted. The frequency response of ordinary differential equations is discussed extensively. Applications of linear algebra are examined, including the use of eigenvalue analysis in the solution of linear systems and in multivariate optimization. An introduction to Fourier analysis is also provided. (Prerequisites: (MATH-241 and MATH-326) or graduate student standing in the MECE-MS or MECE-ME programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-730

Design Project Leadership

This course focuses on preparing students to take on a leadership role in design project teams. Topics include product development processes, management of design project teams, developing a business case for design projects, understanding customer needs and translating them into engineering specifications, tools for developing design concepts, tools for assessing the feasibility of design concepts, conducting engineering tradeoffs and analysis to synthesize a preliminary design. Students use the concepts and tools discussed throughout the course in a team-based environment to develop project packages. (This course is restricted to students in an MECE-BS/MS program or MECE-MS or MECE-ME.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

3
MECE-795

Graduate Seminar (fall and spring)

This seminar course presents topics of contemporary interest to graduate students enrolled in the program. Presentations include off campus speakers, and assistance with progressing on your research. Selected students and faculty may make presentations on current research under way in the department. All graduate students enrolled full time (whether dual degree or single degree) are required to attend a designated number of seminars. (This course is restricted to MECEMS-U or MECE-MS or MECE-ME or MECEME-U Major students.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).

0
STAT-205

General Education – Elective: Applied Statistics

This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252.. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3

General Education – ME Approved Science Elective

3

ME Extended Core Elective

3

Open Elective

3

Graduate Electives

6
Fifth Year
MECE-497

Multidisciplinary Sr. DesignI

This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-301 and MECE-499 or equivalent courses.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-498

Multidisciplinary Sr. DesignII

This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-497 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-709

Advanced Engineering Mathematics

Advanced Engineering Mathematics provides the foundations for complex functions, vector calculus and advanced linear algebra and its applications in analyzing and solving a variety of mechanical engineering problems especially in the areas of mechanics, continuum mechanics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and vibrations. Topics include: vector algebra, vector calculus, functions of complex variables, ordinary differential equations and local stability, advanced matrix algebra, and partial differential equations. Mechanical engineering applications will be discussed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MECE-707 or equivalent course or graduate student standing in MECE-MS or MECE-ME.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3

General Education – Immersion2,3

6

Open Elective

3

Graduate Focus Area Courses

9

Graduate Electives

6
Total Semester Credit Hours

150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Mechanical Engineering, BS degree/Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

CourseSem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181

General Education - Mathematical Perspective A: Project-Based CalculusI

This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisite: A- or better in MATH-111 or A- or better in ((NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) and NMTH-220) or a math placement exam score greater than or equal to 70 or department permission to enroll in this class.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MATH-182

General Education - Mathematical Perspective B: Project-Based CalculusII

This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in (MATH-181 or MATH-173 or 1016-282) or (MATH-171 and MATH-180) or equivalent course(s).) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

4
MECE-102

Engineering Mechanics Laboratory

This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in an accompanying laboratory session. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software. (Prerequisite: This class is restricted to MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MATH-171 or MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 5 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-103

Statics

This basic course treats the equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies under the action of forces. It integrates the mathematical subjects of calculus, vector algebra and simultaneous algebraic equations with the physical concepts of equilibrium in two and three dimensions. Topics include concepts of force and moment, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, and equilibrium of trusses, frames and machines. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-104

Engineering Design Tools

This course combines the elements of Design process, Computer Aided Design (CAD), and Machine Shop Fabrication in the context of a design/build/test project. You will learn how to work in a team and use a formalized design process to justify and support design choices, how to use a CAD package to create three-dimensional models and assemblies, and how to safely fabricate metal parts using vertical mills and lathes. (This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS Major students.) Lab 1 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-117

Introduction to Programming for Engineers

This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or ENGRX-UND or MECEDU-BS.Co-requisite: MATH-181 or MATH-181A or MATH-172 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
YOPS-010

RIT 365: RIT Connections

RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0

General Education - First Year Writing (WI)

3

General Education - Ethical Perspective

3

General Education - Artistic Perspective

3

General Education - Elective

3
Second Year
EGEN-099

Engineering Co-op Preparation

This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).

0
MATH-219

Multivariable Calculus

This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

(Video) Northeastern University Mechanical Engineering BS Student Paige Butler’s Co-op Experience @ NASA JPL

3
MATH-231

Differential Equations

This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MECE-110

Thermodynamics I

A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances. These techniques are then used to evaluate thermodynamic cycles for a variety of applications in power generation and refrigeration. Students are then introduced to techniques to improve thermal efficiency of these cycles such as reheat, regeneration, and co-generation. (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course.Co-requisites: MATH-182 or or MATH-182A or MATH-173 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-203

Strength of Materials I

A basic course in the fundamental principles of the mechanics of deformable media, including stress, strain, deflections and the relationships among them. The basic loadings of tension, compression, shear, torsion and bending are also included. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-204

Strength of Materials I Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-203. Students investigate a metallic material’s response to axial, torsional, and bending loads. Students are introduced to reduction and analysis of data, basic experimental techniques, and effective report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND students.Co-requisites: MECE-203) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-205

Dynamics

A basic course in the kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Newton's Laws and the theorems of work-energy and impulse momentum are applied to a variety of particle problems. Systems of particles are employed to transition to the analysis of rigid body problems. Absolute and relative motion are used to investigate the kinematics and kinetics of systems of rigid bodies. Newton's Laws are applied to a variety of two-dimensional rigid body problems. (Prerequisites: MECE-103 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-210

Fluid Mechanics I

This course investigates the physical characteristics of a fluid: density, stress, pressure, viscosity, temperature, vapor pressure, compressibility. Descriptions of flows include Lagrangian and Eulerian; stream-lines, path-lines and streak-lines. Classification of flows include fluid statics, hydrostatic pressure at a point, pressure field in a static fluid, manometry, forces on submerged surfaces, buoyancy, standard and adiabatic atmospheres. Flow fields and fundamental laws are investigated including systems and control volumes, Reynolds Transport theorem, integral control volume analysis of basic equations for stationary and moving control volumes. Inviscid Bernoulli and the Engineering Bernoulli equation are utilized when analyzing fluid systems. Other concepts studied include incompressible flow in pipes; laminar and turbulent flows, separation phenomenon, dimensional analysis. (Prerequisites: MECE-110 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-211

Engineering Measurements Lab (WI-PR)

This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include:• Physical dimension variability assessment• Centrifugal pump performance evaluation• Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements• LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application• Transient measurements including computer data acquisition• Digital signal input and outputEach topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission (Prerequisites: MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or equivalent course and restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).

2

General Education - Global Perspective

3

General Education - Social Perspective

3

General Education - Scientific Principles Perspective

3

General Education - Immersion1

3
Third Year
EEEE-281

Circuits I

Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

3
MECE-305

Materials Science with Applications

This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers (Prerequisite: MECE-203 or equivalent course. This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS, MECEDU-BS, MECE-MN or ENGRX-UND programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-306

Materials Science with Applications Laboratory

A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS or ENGRX-UND students.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

1
MECE-320

System Dynamics

This required course introduces the student to lumped parameter system modeling, analysis and design. The determination and solution of differential equations that model system behavior is a vital aspect of the course. System response phenomena are characterized in both time and frequency domains and evaluated based on performance criteria. Laboratory exercises enhance student proficiency with model simulation, basic instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and model validation. (Prerequisites: MECE-205 and MATH-231 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: EEEE-281This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lec/Lab 4 (Fall, Spring).

3
MATH-326

Boundary Value Problems

This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems. (Prerequisites: (MATH-231 or MATH-233) and (MATH-219 or MATH-221) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Cooperative Education (fall, summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0
PHYS-212

General Education - Natural Science Inquiry Perspective: University PhysicsII

This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).

4
Fourth Year
MATH-241

Linear Algebra

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MATH-190 or MATH-200 or MATH-219 or MATH-220 or MATH-221 or MATH-221H or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-301

Engineering Applications Laboratory

As a modification of the more “traditional” lab approach, students work in teams to complete an open-ended project involving theoretical and empirical analyses of an assigned system, applying engineering concepts and skills learned throughout prior courses. After successfully completing this course, students will have achieved a higher level of understanding of, and proficiency in, the tasks of qualitative treatment of real systems, development and implementation of analytical models, design and implementation of experimental investigations, and validation of results. (Prerequisites: (MECE-102 or PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206) and MECE-104 and MECE-211 or equivalent courses and is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.Co-requisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).

2
MECE-310

Heat Transfer I

A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods. (Prerequisites: MECE-210 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-348

Contemporary Issues

This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally. (Prerequisite or Co-requisites: MECE-499 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-499

Cooperative Education (summer)

Nominally three months of full-time, paid employment in the mechanical engineering field. (Prerequisites: (MECE-110 and MECE-203 and MECE-211 and EGEN-099) or MECE-499.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).

0
PUBL-701

Graduate Policy Analysis

This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 (Fall).

3
PUBL-702

Graduate Decision Analysis

This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 (Spring).

3
STAT-205

Applied Statistics

This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252.. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

3
STSO-710

Graduate Science and Technology Policy Seminar

Examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence research and development, innovation, and the transfer of technology in the United States and other selected nations. Students in the course will apply basic policy skills, concepts, and methods to contemporary science and technology policy topics. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar (Fall).

3

ME Extended Core Elective

3

General Education - ME Approved Science Elective

3

General Education - Immersion 2

3

Open Elective

3
Fifth Year
MECE-497

Multidisciplinary Sr. DesignI

This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-301 and MECE-499 or equivalent courses.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
MECE-498

Multidisciplinary Sr. DesignII

This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: MECE-497 or equivalent course.This course is restricted to MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS students.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).

3
PUBL-700

Readings in Public Policy

An in-depth inquiry into key contemporary public policy issues. Students will be exposed to a wide range of important public policy texts, and will learn how to write a literature review in a policy area of their choosing. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar (Fall).

3
PUBL-703

Evaluation and Research Design

The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered. Seminar (Spring).

3

Open Elective

3

Applied Elective/Public Policy Electives

6

Open Elective/Public Policy Elective

3

General Education - Immersion 3

3
Choose one of the following:

6

PUBL-785

Capstone Research Experience

The Public Policy Capstone Experience serves as a culminating experience for those MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy students who chose this option in the Public Policy Department. Over the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to investigate and address contemporary topics in science and technology policy using analytic skills and theoretical knowledge learned over the course of their MS degree. Project 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

PUBL-790

Public Policy Thesis

The master's thesis in science, technology, and public policy requires the student to select a thesis topic, advisor and committee; prepare a written thesis proposal for approval by the faculty; present and defend the thesis before a thesis committee; and submit a bound copy of the thesis to the library and to the program chair. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

PUBL-798

Comprehensive Exam plus 2 Graduate Electives

Total Semester Credit Hours

150

Please see General Education Curriculum for more information.

(Video) BS Engineering Entry Test | Electrical / Mechanical Engineering test |IIUI Sample paper Solution.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

FAQs

Is a BS in mechanical engineering good? ›

Is mechanical engineering a good career? Yes. A mechanical engineering degree can lead to careers in many fields, including manufacturing and aerospace. These careers provide strong annual salaries.

What is meaning of BS in mechanical engineering? ›

The Bachelor of Science (BSME) program prepares students for diverse careers in engineering, industry or graduate work. Courses explore fundamental principles of mechanical engineering and their application to modern technological problems.

Is BS mechanical engineering hard? ›

Definetely it is a difficult course. However you don't need to be a valedictorian or an honor students from high school to take up this course. An average student (like me), can take this provided he has a guts to believe in himself first.

How many years is BS mechanical engineering? ›

The Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering, which commonly takes four years to complete, gives students the fundamental technical knowledge they need to obtain a license and get started.

Do mechanical engineers make money? ›

The median annual wage for mechanical engineers was $95,300 in May 2021.

What is the hardest engineering course? ›

Chemical engineering

How do you write BS in Mechanical Engineering? ›

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

What is the full form of BS? ›

Bachelor of Science, an academic degree.

Is Bachelor of Science same as Bachelor of Engineering? ›

A Bachelor of Engineering is academically equal to a Bachelor of Science degree and allows consecutive Master studies. Due to the numerous possibilities for specialisations in the area of Engineering, there are further degree types, such as: the Bachelor of Science in Engineering (B.Sc. in Eng.)

What is the highest paid engineer? ›

In terms of median pay and growth potential, these are the 10 highest paying engineering jobs to consider.
  • Systems Engineer. ...
  • Electrical Engineer. ...
  • Chemical Engineer. ...
  • Big Data Engineer. ...
  • Nuclear Engineer. ...
  • Aerospace Engineer. ...
  • Computer Hardware Engineer. ...
  • Petroleum Engineer.
24 Mar 2022

Is mechanical engineering math heavy? ›

The physical laws governing engineering are heavily mathematical, and so is the training for mechanical engineers. The field requires proficiency in algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics and differential equations.

Which subject is best for mechanical engineering? ›

Maths and physics are generally the most important subjects for mechanical engineering, but many students manage to get on a course without having studied them. Showing a strong personal profile can sometimes be just as important as an academic one.

What subjects mechanical engineering? ›

The fundamental subjects required for mechanical engineering usually include: Mathematics (in particular, calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra) Basic physical sciences (including physics and chemistry) Statics and dynamics.

Which course is best for mechanical engineering? ›

Here are a few of the best courses after mechanical engineering:
  1. MTech in mechanical engineering. ...
  2. Mechatronics. ...
  3. Supply chain management. ...
  4. Masters in business administration. ...
  5. Piping design and engineering. ...
  6. Masters of engineering in tool design. ...
  7. Nanotechnology. ...
  8. 3D modelling.
13 Dec 2021

Can mechanical engineers make 300K? ›

Yes, engineers can make $300K.

However, the only engineers who earn that much money have worked their way up the corporate ladder. In many companies, for instance, the only way to reach a salary of $300K is by becoming a vice president (VP) or a senior vice president (SVP).

Why do mechanical engineers get paid so less? ›

Everyone is of the opinion that the primary reason why mechanical engineer is less paid because the equipments, instruments, tools and machineries used for on board production are 10 times expansive than using in IT industry. Simply it says that the setup cost in core industry is higher.

Is mechanical engineering declining? ›

Mechanical Engineering Industry expects a 17 % drop in production for the year 2020 as a whole. The mechanical and plant engineering industry is fighting against the consequences of the global corona pandemic, but also against protectionism in international trade, which continues to be a burden.

What type of engineer is Elon Musk? ›

Elon Musk has no formal engineering degree, but he clearly is industrial engineer by profession. His approach to business and problem solving is typical industrial engineering approach. His actual degrees (BS in both economics and physics) have good overlap with undergraduate curriculum in IE.

Why is mechanical engineering so hard? ›

Mechanical engineers work with challenging concepts and complex formulae. Mechanical engineering is mathematically rigorous and you must have a sound understanding of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus to succeed in this field. There are numerous resources you can use to improve your math skills.

Is mechanical engineering easy? ›

Mechanical Engineering is a challenging degree. You will need to take many difficult Math, Science, and Engineering courses, along with a wide range of subjects.

Is a Bachelor's degree enough for engineering? ›

Engineers need a bachelor's degree in engineering or a closely related field. Applicants who have a degree in a related science, may become sales engineers. Engineering programs generally require four years of undergraduate study.

Is Bachelor of Engineering a professional degree? ›

Bachelor of Engineering or a B.E. course is a professional degree programme that is dedicated to the field of engineering. B.E. degree is being offered after successful completion of four years of academic study.

Is Bachelor of Engineering a graduate degree? ›

The Bachelor of Engineering (B. Eng. or BE) is an academic degree achieved for undergraduate studies in one of the Engineering Sciences. It takes 3-4 years to graduate a B.

What does BS stand for in engineering? ›

BS stands for Bachelor of Science in engineering. This can be available in various Engineering fields such as Computer Science, Aeronautical, Automobile, Mechanical, Chemical, Civil and Electrical Engineering.

What is a BS in college? ›

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

often note that the latter is typically centered around technical fields. Additionally, there may be more math and science courses or lab work, as opposed to a higher number of electives more common in B.A. programs. Depending on the structure of the program, a B.S.

What is meant by BS in education? ›

A Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree can generally be earned in four years of full-time undergraduate study. The benefits of earning a B.S. degree are numerous, including increased employment opportunities and possibly higher wages.

Is an engineering degree better than a science degree? ›

Neither role is intrinsically better than the other, and both are interconnected. While engineers apply the concepts studied by scientists to their designs, they also develop the instruments and equipment scientists use to observe and study the world, allowing for further scientific research.

How many semesters are there in mechanical engineering? ›

The entire syllabus is divided into 8 semesters.

Which is best degree or engineering? ›

Engineering is a highly technical field that requires specialized knowledge and skills, whereas other degrees may not be as focused on specific disciplines. If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding career, then engineering may be the right choice for you.

Do engineers earn more than doctors? ›

In Indian culture, being a doctor is considered the highest achievement, followed by an engineer as number two. Why is becoming a doctor or an engineer so highly valued?
...
Doctor vs Engineer: Quick Facts.
ParametersDoctorEngineer
Average salaryINR 14,00,000 – 41,00,000 per yearINR 14,00,000 – 30,00,000 per year
4 more rows
8 Jul 2022

What is the most useful engineering degree? ›

Most Popular Engineering Majors in the US
  • Civil Engineering. ...
  • Computer Engineering (CE) ...
  • Chemical Engineering. ...
  • Biomedical Engineering. ...
  • General Engineering. ...
  • Industrial Engineering (IE) ...
  • Aerospace and Aeronautical Engineering. ...
  • Petroleum Engineering.
29 Nov 2020

Which engineer is most in demand? ›

The Most In Demand Engineering Jobs For 2022
  • Automation and robotics engineer. ...
  • Data science & data analytics engineer. ...
  • Project engineer. ...
  • Renewable energy engineer. ...
  • Civil engineer. ...
  • Environmental engineer. ...
  • Biomedical engineer. ...
  • Software systems engineer.
14 Feb 2022

Can I do engineering If I fail in maths? ›

So having failed in Mathematics paper at your Class 12th level academics you are not eligible for pursuing engineering unless you qualify in your failed paper through supplementary examination.

Can I do engineering if my maths is weak? ›

You can easily crack those engineering maths with practice. For engineering, there are 4 mathematics papers in the first four semesters. Remaining some subjects are maths oriented, but it is not that tough. So don't worry about that.

Which engineering uses most math? ›

Electrical? Electrical engineering is the most math heavy of the engineering disciplines. You rely heavily on differential equations when dealing with advanced circuit analysis and electromagnetism is basically a physics and math course. In a close second is mechanical engineering, which uses dynamics a lot.

Which engineering is best for future? ›

Here are the best engineering branches and courses for the future:
  • Aerospace Engineering.
  • Chemical Engineering.
  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering.
  • Petroleum Engineering.
  • Telecommunication Engineering.
  • Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence.
  • Robotics Engineering.
  • Biochemical Engineering.

Is electrical or mechanical engineering harder? ›

Mechanical Engineering vs Electrical Engineering: Which is Harder? Electrical engineering is a challenging discipline to master. It is thought to be the most challenging type of engineering since it requires so much abstract reasoning.

How do you know if engineering is for you? ›

10 Things to Do to Decide if Engineering Is Right for You
  • Do you like to solve problems?
  • Do you like to think of new ways to do things?
  • Do you like puzzles and other mind challenging games?
  • Do you like working with computers?
  • Do you enjoy a challenge?
  • Do you wonder how things work?
9 May 2018

Is mechanical engineering worth it 2022? ›

Mechanical engineers are and will be in demand in 2022 and beyond. Mechanical engineering is very versatile and central to many occupations in industry. The demand is driven by technological innovation that is happening in areas such as energy transition among many others.

What is it like to major in mechanical engineering? ›

Mechanical engineering majors learn about motion and energy, and they study fluid, solid and thermal mechanics. They spend time in labs, where they develop problem-solving skills and evaluate and design products. These products can range from prosthetics to machine parts and car engines.

Why mechanical engineering is a good choice? ›

Mechanical engineers design and build solutions to a range of problems, improving efficiency across a wide range of industries. By studying mechanical engineering, you can look forward to good job prospects, high salaries, and varied work.

How good is an engineering degree? ›

Engineering degrees are worth it if you want a well-paid job with great benefits. According to a survey of 1,350 engineers, 90% stated they would recommend an engineering degree to young students.

Are mechanical engineers happy? ›

As it turns out, mechanical engineers rate their career happiness 3.0 out of 5 stars which puts them in the bottom 33% of careers.

Is mechanical engineering going down? ›

Experts cite various reasons for the declining popularity of civil and mechanical engineering courses. While some say low salaries and lack of adequate job opportunities in these sectors are a deterrent, some others assert that the syllabi are outdated, and hence, graduates lack the skills required by the industry.

Are mechanical engineers in high demand? ›

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS ARE IN DEMAND:

The Bureau of Labor Statistics has projected Mechanical Engineers employment rate will go up by 9% by 2026. Driving this growth are innovations within the automation, medical device, biotechnology and aerospace industries.

How do I know if mechanical engineering is for me? ›

If you have an interest in the design of machines, whether they are mechanical or electrical, then Mechanical Engineering may be a good fit for you. To work as a mechanical engineer, you will need to have a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering and experience working with complex technical systems.

What are the 4 branches of mechanical engineering? ›

Manufacturing. Mechanical Design. System Dynamics and Control. Transportation Systems.

Which job is best for mechanical engineer? ›

Here are the six best-paying jobs in mechanical engineering:
  • Automation engineer.
  • Research and development engineer.
  • Senior mechanical engineer.
  • Senior design engineer.
  • Powertrain engineer.
  • Instrumentation engineer.

What are the disadvantages of being a mechanical engineer? ›

Another downside a mechanical engineer faces is the unpredictability of his workload. Engineering work usually varies from week to week. For instance, in a manufacturing plant, a mechanical engineer does routine maintenance and process control work in one week, while the next week sees him working on another project.

How hard is mechanical engineering? ›

The field of mechanical engineering ranks as one of the hardest majors in part because of its technical requirements. Students must take advanced mathematics and science courses as part of their training.

What do mechanical engineers actually do? ›

Mechanical engineers are problem solvers who apply their skills to design, develop, build, and test all sorts of mechanical devices, tools, engines, and machines in just about every type of industry.

How many engineering students drop out? ›

The attrition rate for engineering students is higher than for most majors. In fact, some studies have found that 50% of engineering majors change majors or drop out prior to graduation.

What is the highest paid engineer? ›

The Highest Paying Engineering Degrees In 2021
  • Petroleum Engineers. Engineer Salary: $114,080 to $166,400 (annually) ...
  • Nuclear Engineers. Engineer Salary: $99,920 to $142,290 (annually) ...
  • Aerospace Engineers. ...
  • Software Engineers. ...
  • Engineering Managers. ...
  • Chemical Engineers. ...
  • Electrical Engineers. ...
  • Biomedical Engineers.
24 Sept 2021

What is the easiest engineering degree? ›

Easiest Engineering Degrees
  • Structural Engineering.
  • Applied Engineering.
  • Chemical engineering.
  • Mechanical Engineering.
  • Software Engineering.
  • Civil Engineering.
  • Computer Engineering.
  • Biomedical Engineering.

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